Henry Hagenbuch’s Revised Birth and Death: The Impact

Port of Philadelphia 1778
Detail of an illustration of the City of Philadelphia, c. mid-1700s. Credit: Library of Congress

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8 Responses

  1. Karen Courie says:

    That was so interesting!! Thank you for your research and analysis!

  2. Will says:

    Good Work!!

  3. Robert Lamlein says:

    Hello fellows….congrats on another great series of stories…. I have a similar situation with my forefather Jacob Winey, who married late for his time and his wife did not have her only child until in her 40s! It does happen of course. There seems to be a lot of missing data…but loads of theories. (One of my aunts adopted 3 children and then became pregnant at 42!) How lucky you are to get a new perspective on Henry’s times…..! Our ancestors’ lives could get complicated as there seems to be little new in human nature! Is Life just about temptations and Death????

    • Andrew Hagenbuch says:

      Thanks, Robert! Yes, there are so many angles to pursue and explore, as you know as well. There are many holes and missing pieces to the puzzle too. That is a great story about your aunt and the adoptions followed by the biological child. Thanks for continuing to read our site 🙂

  4. Lauren Cook says:

    Andrew and Mark,
    Thank you for your previous help! I finally gathered permission from relatives to post some additional info on Anna Lavinia’s family tree. Im a little “tech challenged” and couldnt get signed into ‘Beech Roots’! Is that something you must enter for me!
    Thank you, Lauren Cook (Anna’s Grand-daughter)!

    • Andrew Hagenbuch says:

      Hi Lauren. That’s great to hear and we would be happy to enter this for you! Can you email the information to me directly via my personal email (the one I was communicating with you previously)?

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